Egypt travel info, Explore & Inspire

Egypt – what to wear


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My trip to the Middle East in January meant the weather would be predictable and therefore, easy to pack. I left Australia with my usual One Planet backpack and 12 kgs of gear which is a little more than I would normally take but knowing the weather was going to be cold I took some warmer than usual clothes.

And I still overpacked! Mostly because I got lazy and ended up wearing the same thing every day. Unlike my trip to Burma where the only think I didn’t wear was my raincoat, this trip the list was longer:

  • Raincoat (didn’t rain)
  • Down Vest
  • Fleece pullover
  • Towel (always one at accommodation)
  • Sleeping Bag (was told I would need at Wadi Rum but blankets supplied were very warm despite -2 degrees)
  • Insect Repellent
  • Sunhat (never sunny enough)
  • Soap (always some at accommodation)

I wish I had brought:

  • Nalgene water bottle
  • More moisturiser

My tip for travelling to Egypt in the winter months are two sets.

  • One you’re wearing
  • One you’re washing and it’s hanging up to dry

Firstly, I wear mostly black basics. Tops, shorts, pants, skirt, knickers etc. That way I can usually gain an extra day out of them because they don’t show the dirt. I add colour with scarves, a simple necklace or bracelet. I wear no rings, expensive jewellery or anything of sentimental value when I’m travelling in case I lose it or get robbed. Even a watch you can live without if you have a smart phone.

Everything went in the One Planet backpack and this time I took a One Planet satchel which is larger than the one I took to Burma and Fiji. Spacious, secure pockets for valuables and a little on the funky side.

I don’t take selfies but this one with Dalia my guide is one of 3 taken on the entire trip.

Here is a list of everything that I took (including what I wore to and from Australia to Cairo) and return that covers all occasions for a January/February trip:

  • 1 x North Face long black pants with lots of pockets, some with zips.
  • 1 x Kathmandu long black pants with lots of pockets
  • 3 x long sleeve black cotton t-shirts
  • 1 x short sleeve black cotton t-shirt
  • 3 x black cotton underwear
  • 2 x bras
  • 3 x pairs of wool socks
  • 1 x sarong for multiple uses (used as a pillow, bath wrap  tablecloth, tote bag, sun protection and blanket).
  • 1 x 200 weight fleece jacket with zip up the front and 3 good pockets
  • 1 x wide-brimmed grey hat with foreign legion flaps and a tie for under the neck (great when it’s windy) (not worn)
  • 2 x scarves – one blue, one purple that complemented my clothes (lovely scarves in Cairo)
  • 1 x Merrell light weight walking shoes (the only shoes I took and the only shoes I needed)
  • 1 x swimsuit (worn once to swim in the Dead Sea)
  • 1 x raincoat (not worn)
  • 1 x glasses (which I wear all the time & 1 spare just in case)
  • 1 x sunglasses (prescriptions)
  • 1 x ear plugs
Dahab water is salty so washing out my underwear meant they had residual salt on them when dry.

Apart from toiletries, the other items I brought were:

  • Head torch
  • Spork
  • iPhone, charger, headphones – click here for more info
  • Ipad keyboard with blue tooth used in conjunction with iPhone 6+
  • Plug adaptors
  • Pocket knife
  • Mini first aid kit – click here for more info
  • 3 small karabiners to attach things to my tote bag
  • 2 x small wallets – one for local currency and one that holds Australian currency & credit cards
  • Passport in a wallet with travel documents
  • Foldable bag (below)
  • My travelling owl – click here for more info

When you put it in a list it looks a lot but it wasn’t much at all. Only 12kgs and that’s a very manageable weight to shuttle around airports, trains, buses and so on. On my return my bag weighted 16kgs because I’d bought three rugs which I was able to bring back with me.

Now it’s your turn. Share your stories on what you’ve taken away that’s been useful and what hasn’t in the comments below.

Happy travelling.

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